Toy Safety

Return to the main ’Key Knowledge’ page to see all the ‘Let’s Learn’ areas

teddy 2335

Toys have to be designed and made to meet safety requirements including mechanical safety, hygiene, flammability, toxic materials, choke hazards etc. Toy companies keep records to show products meet these standards. Toy retailers have to ensure their goods have labels on to show they meet the standards.


All toys must:

toys 6257
  • Satisfy essential safety requirements set out in the regulations
  • Have the CE marking preferably on the toy but on the packing if this is not possible
  • Include company name and address details
  • Be accompanied by warnings e.g. age appropriate labels, whether supervision is required
  • Have had risk assessments and tests done on them to ensure they meet the standards


The CE Symbol

MVC-024S copy

Toys must have this symbol on them by law. It indicates the toy meets the European Toy Safety Directive. This is aimed at Trading Standards and tells them the toy is allowed to be sold in Europe.  It is less relevant to the average consumer and doesn’t necessarily indicate quality and safety for the consumer.


The Lion Mark

IMG 2469 copy

A symbol developed by the British Toy and Hobby Association as a symbol of toy safety and quality. It can only be used by members of the BTHA. This is a voluntary symbol.



Age Appropriate Labels

IMG 2469 copy 2

One of the principles of the Lion Mark scheme is that toys are used by children of an appropriate age. This symbol indicates the toy is not suitable for a child under 3 e.g. because of a choke or suffocation hazard.


 The Kitemark

kitemark 4818 copy

Some toys also carry the British Standards Institute Kitemark. This indicates the toy has been independently tested and complies with BS EN 71.

                              



ThinkDo
  • Look at at least 5 different toys to see the above labels in use both on the product and on the packaging. Take photos of the products and the labels. 
  • Explain why each label has been chosen for that particular product
  • Practise drawing the labels yourself
  • Investigate what tests might be carried out to check a toy is safe by visiting The Toy Retailers Association and The British Standards Institute websites 
  • Evaluate how these symbols add value to the product for the consumer?
  • Look at one of the toys you selected that has an age appropriate label on it. How could the product be developed so it is suitable for a child under 3?
costume 2864


Return to the main ’Key Knowledge’ page to see all the ‘Let’s Learn’ areas


Contact:     Tel 01159 607061    Mob 07972 749240   Email julie@julieboyd.co.uk

You can also find a contact form under 'About'  on the top menu bar

© JULIE BOYD 2012  ALL  TEXT, IMAGES & IDEAS ON THIS WEBSITE ARE THE COPYRIGHT OF JULIE BOYD & MAY NOT BE COPIED OR REPRODUCED WITHOUT PERMISSION. All rights reserved.